screen culture

Screen culture is best considered a set of practices ways of doing. These ways of doing are informed by institutional processes, as well as the personal or everyday, and in the context of this paper by technology.

It is not that technology utterly determines practice, but rather that we meet it in an almost liminal space. I suppose this is one of the things that interface should mean.

Screen culture probably has four faces:

production practice (the culture of making)

film culture (the culture of the cinema)

film studies (screen education)

computer screen culture (hypertext/hypermedia)

Digital culture can be something else.

computer culture

computer culture

Computer culture is a variety of what is probably digital culture, and in the context of screen studies has a particular resonance.

However, the cinema screen is not equivalent to the computer screen (movies on computer are a phenomenologically different experience to movies on the big screen television is a reminder of this).

The aesthetic difference (and distance) between these forms is the difference between painting with light and illuminating pixels (light from outside versus light from inside).

For film studies digital culture may be as exceptional a development as it has been in production, but it remains to be seen what relation it will have to film culture.

film studies

film studies

Film studies is the practice of studying cinema in its manifold aspects. This is the domain of pedagogy and is fundamental to the development of a critical audience, cultural policy, and cultural capital (which tends to translate into economic capital).

film culture

film culture

Film culture is what happens, and what we do, when we go to the movies.

In doesn t need to have a formal or strict relation to film studies (screen education), indeed it can manage without any such relation. (Novels are read and survive outside of courses of study in literature.)

production practice

production practice

Film (and television) texts are made through various industrial, semi industrial, and guild practices. Digitisation has had a dramatic impact on the processes of production and distribution, at all levels, and it is apparent that this will continue to be the case. More analog technologies will become digitally mediated, and more work will be done in the digital domain.